Kirkcudbright Harbour | Fujifilm X100 720nm Infrared [Part I]

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MYTILUS | BS-449 [Belfast].

Anyone who knows me well, knows also that I am an utter fan of boats; ships, water and, pretty much any vessel that floats! This is the first of a number of posts, where I will share frames from what happened to be, an absolute mammoth day for IR photography and, for me personally, shooting some of my absolute favourite things.

My first stop was Kirkcudbright Harbour, where I photographed many of the fishing vessels moored there, preparing for sea. Though I shall post in no particular order, the 24m mussel dredger, MYTILUS was indeed the first to steal my attention. Perhaps you can see why? An absolutely beautiful ship, to say the least.

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MYTILUS | BS-449:

Post.060.fullspectra.wordpress.com (2)Fujifilm X100 [SSC] + Hoya R72 | 720nm IR | 1/1700th | f8 | ISO:400 | Matrix | -0.3 | LR4.4

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Post.060.fullspectra.wordpress.com (1)Fujifilm X100 [SSC] + Hoya R72 | 720nm IR | 1/900th | f8 | ISO:400 | Matrix | -0.3 | LR4.4

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Post.060.fullspectra.wordpress.com (3)Fujifilm X100 [SSC] + Hoya R72 | 720nm IR | 1/2400th | f8 | ISO:400 | Matrix | -0.3 | LR4.4

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Wigtown Bay Sunset | VIS vs Split-Spectrum + UVIR

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Just Five Minutes.

Sometimes, words are quite simply, woefully – inadequate.

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Moments Before:

Post.059.fullspectra.wordpress.com (1)Fujifilm X100 Split Spectrum | Leica UVIR Cut | 1/170th | 5.6 | ISO:640 | -0.3 | Matrix

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Moments After:

Post.059.fullspectra.wordpress.com (2)Fujifilm X-T1 | XF 35mm f2 WR | 1/170th | 8.0 | ISO:400 | -0.3 | Matrix

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In Appreciation of Light: A Collection

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I Will Draw Infinity.

“As nature paints the ne’er before seen
Upon an infinite, gaseous canvas
We think ourselves the artists,
Press a shutter, make a capture.
Are we thus, ‘entitled plagiarists’,
With licence to forge our art?
Such, drawn by force untamable
Never possible, on our humble part.

Though we’ve created nothing like,
Merely stolen unique moments
Of nature, time and space and colour,
Of light and dark components.
Sometimes, I wonder, whimsically,
How nature intends the light.
No cost, for equal awe and curse, or,
What purse on the Copyright?

Still, motionless, in amazement,
To the light I’ll raise my aging face, and
I shall lift my camera to my eye
Drawing infinity into this tiny…
…space.”

RL.

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As always, thank you for visiting FULLSPECTRA, also, for your always welcomed clicks and comments. If you wish to receive updates and notifications of future posts, please consider clicking ‘FOLLOW’, below. No unauthorised copying or redistribution. All Rights Reserved.

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What’s in Your Garden? [Part 6]

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Cheap Shots, Perhaps?

With an hour to kill this morning, I took a pew in the garden and watched the birds for a while. Of course, I wondered if I’d get a few frames worthy of review and so, I mounted my XF 18-135, silenced the shutter on my X-T1, set it up and watched them all flitting greedily between the feeders. I was always under the impression (having never shot like this before) that shooting wildlife at feeding stations must be a bit of a breeze. How wrong I have proved myself to be. These little critters never stop moving!

Setting up a chair near each one, only moving between them every twenty minutes or so, I was able to inch my seats forward towards each of the feeders considerably, and rather easily, without scaring them off (the Nuthatch was pretty twitchy, though)- it seems that wild birds aren’t quite so wild as long as they’re getting free, easy pickings, that and the ability to remain reasonably still for almost ten minutes at a time! Still, at the long end, even 135mm isn’t that long for this kind of caper and getting as physically close as I could was the only way I could have grabbed these shots without heavy cropping. For reference, the closest shot was from around four feet away from them. They didn’t seem too bothered. 

R.

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Post.057.fullspectra.wordpress.com (3)Fujifilm X-T1 | 18-135mm | 135mm | 1/450th | f6.4 | ISO:1600 | -0.7 | Spot

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Post.057.fullspectra.wordpress.com (1)Fujifilm X-T1 | 18-135mm | 135mm | 1/340th | f5.6 | ISO:1600 | -0.7 | Spot

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Post.057.fullspectra.wordpress.com (2)Fujifilm X-T1 | 18-135mm | 135mm | 1/220th | f7.1 | ISO:1600 | -0.7 | Spot

[Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4 – Part 5]

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Little Spires | Fujifilm X100 | False-Colour 720nm IR

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Faux-Colour IR Processing | Note to Self: Quality Beats Quantity.

Okee doke – I have to admit that since having taken delivery of my X100 Split-Spectrum conversion from Amar, I have been more than impressed by the output of this little camera (of which I have joyfully had years of experience) with regards to IR shooting. But a recent comment from Mal Holmes (you can find a link to Mal’s IR work on my ‘Hints & Tips’ page) regarding false colour infrared processing of files from the Fujifilm sensor – got me thinking, because there was something I had struggled with. Now, whether this was an element specific to the Fuji sensor or just false-colour IR workflow in general, I’m not sure or, even concerned. It did make me reflect, though.

My last two posts contain images that I processed from the X100 [SSC] + IR72 had me reeling a bit, once I’d saved their final versions, but, after almost a full week back at work and no time to indulge myself here has today, rendered my ‘vision’ slightly – different. In short, I read Mal’s comments and took another look at my previously saved files and saw something that oddly, I couldn’t identify. Something that I wasn’t happy with – just a small niggle. Yes, indeed, the files took a much longer while to work on than I usually spend, largely due to the complexities of producing believable colours within an infrared captured scene and what I was being ‘bugged’ by wasn’t something I could have seen, the last time I had the opportunity to spend time on them. I believe that the reason for this was that I had spent so long sitting at my laptop, viewing, processing, reviewing and so on, that my eyes had become accustomed to the colours I had been working towards and, blind to something better. I also got myself caught in a completely self-made trap of attempting to produce a similar colour feel for images I’d taken as part of a series, rather than concentrating on each image as a separate entity within each, their own set of values and parameters. Lesson learned.

So, what was it that bothered me? Well, I did put my finger on it today: in my previously saved images there exists a coldness; or, a lack of warmth. I’m not referring to WB issues here, either. Far from it. It boiled down to much more than this. In my haste (key word, right there!) to see what I could achieve with this wonderful, new (to me, at least) toy, I both rushed my workflow and, in my keenness to complete my tasks, failed to take a proverbial step-back now and then which would have (had I taken the time to do so) given me the opportunities to see more clearly that I hadn’t got it quite right. My eyes, my brain – they had become attuned to what I had produced because, I believe, that I hadn’t taken the time to give them something different to absorb. As a result of this, I took another look today at one or two images from the series – spent a little more time and corrected my errors. Furthermore, and, more importantly, I must remember that quality beats quantity, every time.

Lessons learned.

R.

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Little Spires:

Post.056.fullspectra.wordpress.comFujifilm X100 [SSC] | Hoya R72 | 1/250th | f8 | ISO:200 | -0.7 | Matrix | LR4.4 + PF7

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Infrared: Colour & Monochrome Comparison | Fujifilm X100 720nm IR

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Water of Fleet.

Having spent some time getting myself familiar with a new processing workflow for false colour infrared, I am now very happy to post another couple of images that will, I hope, display the stark contrast in emotion between the two media; the other of course being, monochrome. The X100 split-spectrum conversion continues to please and dare I say, astound and, I hope that you will enjoy this pair of images as much as I have enjoyed making them. Oddly – though my heart tells me what’s obvious, my head can’t decide which mood I like more. 

R.

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Upon Reflection:

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Fujifilm X100 [SSC] | Hoya R72 | 1/350th | f8 | ISO:200 | -0.7 | Matrix | LR4.4 + PF7

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The Mill on the Fleet | Gatehouse | 720nm IR

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Faux-Colour Infrared | Fujifilm X100 (Split-Spectrum) + R72.

The sun was shining brightly today; the sky was as blue as I have ever seen it at this time of year, outside temperature was definitely up and, the roof of my car was begging to be dropped. What better a day to take a trip out with my newest picture-making box thing?! Now, the wish to make this post has surprised me a bit. If you read my last post (I’m not sure how many simply look at the photographs – no matter) you’ll recall that I stated, honestly, that faux-colour IR output has long since not been my thing. Not since I produced such with my old converted Nikon D70 over ten years ago, to be more accurate. However, my good friend and all-round clever chap, Amar, sent me my latest infrared toy – the Fuji X100 Split-Spectrum conversion. Internally it has Schott Glass (350nm) over the sensor which means in simple terms, I can use a UVIR Cut filter on the lens to shoot normal colour, visible light only – or, with an R72 on the lens (or any IR filter of choice), I can shoot IR to my heart’s content.

The thing is, unlike any other IR set-up I have used in the past (save for the aforementioned D70 conversion) – the files from the X100 [SSC] convert to faux-colour surprisingly well, as I found out when I uploaded my RAWs on my return home and, impatiently having had a play around with the very first file. (The black and white conversion is absolutely lovely too, but as I receive more inquiries about faux-colour infrared than monochrome, I feel it should be my duty to post this one up – and show you what can be achieved with it. It’s potential, so to speak). I’m sure there will be many who can far surpass this kind of work – but I like it. I hope that you will, too. 

R.

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The Mill | Water of Fleet:

Post.054.fullspectra.wordpress.com (1)Fujifilm X100 [SSC] | Hoya R72 | 1/600th | f8 | ISO:200 | -0.7 | Matrix | LR4.4 + PF7

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As always, thank you for visiting FULLSPECTRA, also, for your always welcomed clicks and comments. If you wish to receive updates and notifications of future posts, please consider clicking ‘FOLLOW’, below. No unauthorised copying or redistribution. All Rights Reserved.

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Digital Infrared Photography | How To: A Shooting & Processing Guide

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Infrared: Made Simpler.

Here in the Northern Hemisphere, we are approaching that time of year most conducive to infrared photography and, I know that there are many of you out there, interested in this genre of imagery. As of now, my previous posts on this subject have been constrained to ideas, equipment and general discussion about alternative wavelengths for the purposes of photography. At this time, I wish to discuss and share with you, some of my ideas and practices from taking IR photographs to processing them. My hopes, now, in this one single post, are to simplify ideas, debunk any IR or Alternative Wavelength myths, share ideas on this genre and post-processing guidelines, and, anything else that comes to my mind as I write all of this. This post is primarily for anyone with an interest and little practice in IR photography – newbies, if you will, or anyone who is having difficulty with any aspect of infrared capturing. If you fit into either of, or both of these categories, please do read through my Light Reading page, before proceeding with this post. If you simply wish to browse through – please read on. In any respect, welcome. I hope to shed some (ahem!) light on the subject. (This post will be assigned it’s own page, also, for ease of reference, only because the older posts become, the less they’re seen or read). Please read A Little Light Reading in conjunction with this post.

[Disclaimer: Please do not take this post as a ‘Tutorial’. I can only post on the basis of my own techniques, equipment and software choices. Yours will of course, vary. As such, this post is intended as a helping-hand for anyone wishing to understand the subject in a little more depth without the need to surf the web endlessly for the same information in often, more complicated language. As I am not a ‘tech’ – I will use only plain English and real-life examples].

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Wood & Stones. IR 720nm:

ir-fullspectra-wordpress-com-light-reading-8Ricoh GXR | A16 LTFS | 24mm | 1/60th | f6.3 | ISO:100 | Matrix | -0.3 |  LR4.4

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Daffodils after Rain. IR 720nm:

POST.053.FULLSPECTRA.WORDPRESS.COM (0)Fujifilm X100 | Internal Split-Spectrum + R72 | 1/500th | f8 | ISO:200 | LR4.4

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A Myth: Infrared Photography is Complicated.

Infrared photography is not complicated. Nor is it a mystery. No matter what you have read, seen, or heard, it’s as simple as taking a ‘normal’, visible wavelength photograph and (if you wish) post-processing, once captured. Any desire to shoot IR images should not be clouded by this myth, lest it should deter or hinder you from taking-up and enjoying this wonderful and beautiful area of our art. The only differences, ostensibly, are: your chosen method and equipment, pre-shoot WB considerations and, some differences in processing techniques, thereafter. Once some very simple requirements are understood, it will become apparent that this genre of photography is really no different to that which you have been used to already. If you don’t believe me yet, that ‘s perfectly alright. I hope to make it all clear by the end of the post.

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Options & Preferences.

Assuming that you have either some knowledge already or, you have read and largely understood my Light Reading page, you will by now understand the reasons as to why IR photographs look so different, which section of wavelengths within the EMS (electromagnetic spectrum) are captured and how to manipulate them, and, that there are many ways in which we can capture IR images with regards to equipment and, a number of different ways in which such images can be processed for final output. I am also working on the caveat that you have some photographic and camera ability and, a reasonable familiarity with post-processing concepts using at least one or two different packages. This area, I will touch on, also.

Equipment:

Most commonly nowadays, the option to have a digital camera internally converted for IR photography by removing the internal blocking filter and replacing it with an IR filter of one’s chosen wavelength, is a most popular option for handheld IR shooting. Personally, I prefer (the accepted standard) 720nm wavelength, but to have an IR filter placed internally is only one option that allows handheld IR photography. Another option is to have no IR filter fitted internally at all, and instead, to have clear glass placed in front of the sensor instead, thus rendering the camera either full or split spectrum (depending on the grade of UV blocking glass inserted).

To recap, here are some options, with pros ‘n cons:

  • Placing an IR filter of choice onto the front of a lens mounted to an unconverted camera.

  • Pros: Quick, easy and cheap to do for any wavelength of choice by simply purchasing screw-on lens filters.

  • Cons: Many cameras have an IR-blocking filter which would still need to be removed to succeed. Some lenses may not be suitable for channelling IR light, apparent by the display of visible to strong, sizeable light or ‘hot’ spots, in the centre of the image frame becoming stronger as the lens is stopped-down. Furthermore, as so much light is blocked by the filter, you’ll need to carry and use a tripod because exposure-times will be lengthy, even on a bright sunny day.

  • Removal of the internal UV & IR-blocking filters from the front of the camera sensor and, replacing it with clear glass of 350nm to 400nm, thus allowing VIS & IR light to pass through to the sensor and, use of an IR filter of choice over the lens’ front element.

  • Pros: Permits LTSS photography without the use of any external filters. Quick, easy and cheap to do for any wavelength of choice, though limited to wavelengths upwards from ~400nm, by simply purchasing screw-on lens filters. (Remember: whenever you insert a filter of any wavelength, you are effectively splitting the spectrum, hence the name, split-spectrum, or, LTSS).

  • Cons: Internal conversions can be expensive. Some lenses may not be suitable for channelling IR light, apparent by the display of visible to strong, sizeable light or ‘hot’ spots, in the centre of the image frame becoming stronger as the lens is stopped-down.

  • Removal of internal IR blocking filter and replacing with an IR filter of choice, internally, blocking all wavelengths below the rating of the inserted filter.

  • Pros: Makes for a dedicated IR only camera. No need for external filters on the lens. Higher rated filters can be placed on the lens if longer wavelength IR images are sought.

  • Cons: Careful choice of internal IR filter is required, as, too high a rating will limit the user to longer wavelengths only. Conversely, a lower rating of IR filter will still allow longer wavelengths to be captured. For example, a 590nm ‘Goldie’ filter will permit all light from 590nm upwards into the IR spectrum to be recorded by the sensor. By placing an 850nm IR filter onto the front of the lens will permit light from 850nm and upwards, only, useful for darker skies in the right conditions and, higher contrast monochromatic IR images. Overall, a versatile choice to have. Internal conversions can be expensive. Some lenses may not be suitable for channelling IR light, apparent by the display of visible to strong, sizeable light or ‘hot’ spots, in the centre of the image frame becoming stronger as the lens is stopped-down.

  • Internal conversion to LTFS (true, full-spectrum) by removal of all internal filters anterior to the sensor and use of mounted IR filters over the lens element.

  • Pros: The most versatile option as this allows shooting any range of wavelengths within the EMS or simply black and white LTFS. Once converted, quick, easy and cheap to do for any wavelength of choice UV/VIS/IR by simply purchasing screw-on lens filters to block / permit your chosen wavelengths.

  • Cons: Internal conversions can be expensive. Some lenses may not be suitable for channelling IR light, apparent by the display of visible to strong, sizeable light or ‘hot’ spots, in the centre of the image frame becoming stronger as the lens is stopped-down.

  • Infrared processing profiles in some editing suites. (It’s an ‘option’, so I’m obliged to mention it).

  • Pros: No need to purchase any IR or LTFS conversions, filters, or learn anything about the subject or, shooting in alternative wavelengths.

  • Cons: Do I really need to list them?

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Wellspring, River Dee. IR 720nm:

POST.053.FULLSPECTRA.WORDPRESS.COM (00)Ricoh GXR | A16 LTFS + R72 | 24mm | 1/190th | f7.6 | ISO:500 | Matrix | -0.3 |  LR4.4

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There is a huge choice of processing software out there, however, I like to keep things simple when it comes to my workflow and therefore I only use two packages. My main software is Lightroom, which pretty must does everything I need a program to do. When I process IR images for black and white, this is all the software I need. However, I have yet to find a way to swap RGB channels using LR if I decide to process for faux-colour IR, so for this function, I use a small program called PhotoFiltre 7 which has an easy channel-swapping function in it’s Filter > Colour, menu. Other software is out there for this function but I see no reason to pay for it, for the sake of one or two functions. PF7 is remarkably solid and I’ve been using it for certain functions for many years – both the .exe and the portable versions. For a freebie, it’s worth a look if you don’t have a channel swapper embedded in your current software. This point aside, I will describe further on in this article, my typical workflow for IR processing, both for monochromatic and faux colour, though the latter is not an area I work with all that often if, at all. But, for completeness, I’ll cover that too because I know that many do enjoy it.

I will now briefly discuss some techniques that I use and, hopefully, it’ll all make sense. I’m not going to post endless streams of screenshots but instead, concise ideas from practices that work and, have worked for me. The rest, you’ll be able to figure out for yourself by simple experimentation – trial and error, so to speak. As I said, this isn’t a tutorial, not as such.

Right – preamble done, let’s get to business. I’m going to work on the principle of working with an internally converted IR unit, or similarly, a full or split-spectrum conversion utilising an IR filter on the lens; something like a Hoya R72. This type of set-up allows for handheld shooting, as you might when shooting in normal daylight conditions. (Using a non-converted unit with an IR filter over the lens would require a tripod or other steady support to accommodate longer exposures due to the presence of the internal IR blocking-filter).

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Photographing Infrared Images.

So, you have your infrared-capable camera and lens – and you want to take your first infrared exposures. Excellent choice! What do we need to consider differently from shooting natural light, before we begin? The simple answer here is: nothing at all. Set your camera up as you would normally, but pay close attention to your white balance settings. Rule of thumb for any WB setting is: if you’re capturing below 600nm with an IR capable camera, manually set your WB using a white or grey surface (or card); for setting WB for wavelengths above 600nm – use green foliage or green grass (I specify green grass because grass comes in many colours). Therefore, manually acquire your WB setting and generally, you’re good to go. Your pre-set, in-camera WB menu will not work for you here. Make your Manual WB option on your camera, your new best friend!

Bear in mind also that when shooting for IR, you may wish to stop your lens down a little more, due to the difference in focusing lengths between visible light and infrared. Anywhere between f5.6-f11 I have found to be ideal for adequate depth of field for landscapes and similar subjects. Image softening at smaller apertures does not seem to be such an issue when capturing only IR light so don’t be afraid to stop your lens down beyond f8. On cameras that I have used, all seem to have around an f10 sweet-spot. Your camera / lens combination may differ – and there’s nothing to stop you playing around to find out what it is.

Certain subjects work better than others, in IR. Most commonly, any scene where the Wood effect is prevalent, with some man-made structures worked into the same scene, work beautifully. Waterscapes work well too and, even portraits can be very interesting. But if you’re reading this out of curiosity or genuine interest, you’ve probably already seen the type of images you want to make yourself all over the web and, will probably have a fair idea as to what might make a workable, eye-catching IR image. Once you have set-up your camera correctly, all you have to do is to work with your chosen subject – and shoot it. Stick to RAW or RAW+JPG if you can; this will give your images more latitude when it comes to processing, later.

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Original IR (720nm) RAW:

POST.053.FULLSPECTRA.WORDPRESS.COM (1)Fujifilm X100 | Internal Split-Spectrum + R72 | 1/400th | f8 | ISO:200 | LR4.4

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Now, I’ll assume that you have made a few captures and now wish to upload to your computer for review and processing. The above image is an example of a RAW, captured using the considerations already discussed. This one, I captured from my back garden this morning – no artistic value intended (or found!) and is merely for ease of demonstration. Once I have uploaded my RAWs to LR and synchronised my library, I naturally take a look at what I’ve captured. At this stage, any obvious duffers get deleted, pronto. I will work with what I have left based on the premise that one cannot polish a t*rd, nor would I waste my time even trying. If a shot is poor due to poor camera craft, no software will save it. Now, I will select the first RAW that I wish to work with – typically, each frame can take me from between 5 to around 15 minutes to complete, depending on how many processing elements I put it through, or, whether I am processing for black and white or faux-colour. I will discuss a simple black and white conversion first.

Before I convert the colour RAW to B&W in Lightroom – I make certain adjustments to the image. In colour, though colours will be limited to shades of blacks / browns / reds / magentas and whites, I find it easier to see the effects of changes. Depending on image characteristics and exposure levels, I tend to make only the following adjustments: Contrast, Clarity, Blacks, Highlights, Sharpness, 5% Toning. There would be little point in my listing actual values of each adjustment as, such adjustments are always exposure-specific – besides, I wouldn’t want your images to look like mine; they should look like yours. Here is your first trial and error exercise.

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Adjusted in LR. Used for both Monochrome & Faux-Colour Output:

POST.053.FULLSPECTRA.WORDPRESS.COM (2)Fujifilm X100 | Internal Split-Spectrum + R72 | 1/400th | f8 | ISO:200 | LR4.4

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Whatever looks good to you, is good. Of course, there may be more than one way to process for any frame so, have a jiggle around and find your favourite looks; just as you would for any normal colour image. Once you have it, proceed to converting to mono in your chosen software – re-tweek anything within the image that you feel needs it and, once you’re happy – export it and, you’re done. Here’s my black and white from the original RAW:

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Black & White Conversion from Above Image:

POST.053.FULLSPECTRA.WORDPRESS.COM (3)Fujifilm X100 | Internal Split-Spectrum + R72 | 1/400th | f8 | ISO:200 | LR4.4

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Black and white may not be your ultimate goal, however – and you may wish to process for faux colour. Here’s how I do it, though there are more complex ways of doing it. Essentially, what you need to remember is that in order to get the skies in your IR frame, blue – the RGB channels need to be swapped over, to BGR. In other words – the red information in your skies becomes blue and, blue colour information becomes, red. As IR frames possess no blue information prior to channel-swapping, that’s one less thing to worry about. What we are interested in is, turning the red sky, blue. To make it look more ‘believable’ as a focal point of the image (hence the word ‘faux’ or fake). When shooting IR at wavelengths below 600nm (such as the 590nm ‘Goldie’ look) this process is not usually performed, typically. But as we are working with 720nm here, we will go ahead and swap the channels over. Before doing so, you must be happy with how your RAW looks prior to the point at which we previously discussed converting it to black and white, because, instead of converting to black and white now, we are going to export as a jpg. Once saved as a jpg, I open mine in PF7 and go to the Filter menu, then, Color and click Swap RGB Channel. With Direct Preview checked, click on the very bottom channel option: RGB ==> BGR and then, OK. Now, save your image and reimport your new image back into your main software program.

In LR, I will then make minor adjustment to the jpg file. As we are now dealing with a compressed format, my adjustments here will be small so that I do not risk destroying the file in any way. This is the main reason that we process the RAW as best we can prior to export for channel-swapping – so that fewer or lighter adjustments are needed once reimported. Typically, the only adjustments I will make to a faux-colour IR jpg will be to the blue channel, (hue, saturation and lightness – to taste, but minimally) and, desaturation of other stray channels of colour that I find distracting. Split-toning is also a useful tool here, in small measures to greater effect – however, such techniques are subjective and should be practiced at your leisure, until you find something that you’re pleased with. Toning the highlights is a helpful and useful way of colouring the foliage to a hue more pleasing than you may find complete desaturation, to be. Here then, having used the processes discussed, is my faux-colour version of the image:

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Channels Swapped from Frame 2 in Series for Faux-Colour Output:

POST.053.FULLSPECTRA.WORDPRESS.COM (4)Fujifilm X100 | Internal Split-Spectrum + R72 | 1/400th | f8 | ISO:200 | LR4.4

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Please do feel free to drop me a line with any and all queries or corrections. I’ll be very happy to hear from you. All images within this post have been captured with either my Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS conversion + R72 or, my Fujifilm X100 Split-Spectrum conversion, also utilising a front-threaded Hoya R72 IR filter. My thanks go out to Amar Verma at vermatec for supplying these wonderful conversions. (The Fuji is working a treat, my friend!)

I would also like to thank Mal Holmes for getting in touch recently regarding the subject of IR photography and, most notably on the topic of lens selection for infrared photography. Mal has kindly posted a link to an extensive database of lenses used for IR – which list those lenses that are suitable and, those which should probably be best avoided. Thank you, Mal! You can view Mal’s excellent IR imagery, here.


DISCLAIMER: Anyone wishing to have their camera(s) converted for any purpose, including for the pursuit of alternative wavelength photography – is responsible for performing their own research as to whether such a conversion is possible for the model of camera they propose to modify, for sourcing a qualified and reliable technician or company for the purpose of performing such modification work and should NOT, under ANY circumstances attempt to perform such modifications themselves, unless fully qualified to do so. I, nor any person(s) associated with FULLSPECTRA, Rob Lowe Photography, or WordPress.com accept ANY liability for injury or injuries to person or persons, or damage to, or loss of, completely or in part thereof – any equipment or warranties, actual or implied, whatsoever, whether this advice is, or not, observed.


As always, thank you for visiting FULLSPECTRA, also, for your always welcomed clicks and comments. If you wish to receive updates and notifications of future posts, please consider clicking ‘FOLLOW’, below. No unauthorised copying or redistribution. All Rights Reserved.

ALL WORDS & IMAGES © FULLSPECTRA / ROB LOWE PHOTOGRAPHY 2017

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Decay [Part 3] | The Loch Ryan Lady | GXR A12 28/2.5

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Revisiting the Ol’ Girl.

Like the Wellspring, I have enjoyed photographing this old boat for over ten years. She has a certain charm, you see? Maybe you don’t – but I remember her when her paint-finish had more integrity; when her (admittedly, crude) name-plaque was still attached to her (before it was removed, by a possible souvenir-hunter some seven or eight years ago); when her steel trims (which now sway easily from side to side in a stiff breeze) were still riveted down; and, when her rudder wasn’t so ruined by rust. On the bank of the Dee in Kirkcudbright, some two or three dozen yards away from the aforementioned Wellspring, she sits too, alone and weathered. Isn’t she a treat?! 

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[Images Resized for Web. Click each to Open in New Tab / Window]

POS.052.FULLSPECTRA.WORDPRESS.COM (3)Ricoh GXR | A12 18mm (28mm Equiv) | 1/1150th | f5 | ISO:200 | -0.7 | Spot | LR4.4

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POS.052.FULLSPECTRA.WORDPRESS.COM (2)Ricoh GXR | A12 18mm (28mm Equiv) | 1/400th | f5 | ISO:200 | -0.7 | Spot | LR4.4

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POS.052.FULLSPECTRA.WORDPRESS.COM (1)Ricoh GXR | A12 18mm (28mm Equiv) | 1/640th | f5 | ISO:200 | -0.3 | Matrix | LR4.4

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As always, thank you for visiting FULLSPECTRA, also, for your always welcomed clicks and comments. If you wish to receive updates and notifications of future posts, please consider clicking ‘FOLLOW’, below. No unauthorised copying or redistribution. All Rights Reserved.

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A Legacy | ‘Morvo’s Last Stand

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The Scott Monument | Edinburgh.

This is probably one of, if not the most famous sight in Edinburgh. The Architect was a man named George Meikle Kemp, a self-taught architect from Biggar who did not live to see the completion of this, the last and, probably greatest of his life’s achievements – his memorial to Sir Walter Scott. Building commenced in 1840 and finished in 1844. At a height of 200 feet and 6 inches, with 287 internal steps to the top, it guarantees the most incredible views over the city. 

After Scott passed away in 1832, a competition was held in order to find the most suitable design for a monument to the author. One of the entries submitted was from a gentleman known as John Morvo (he, of the same who designed Melrose Abbey). Of course, John Morvo was in fact, Kemp – using a pseudonym in order to subdue the fact that he had no actual architectural qualifications. Still, Morvo won the competition and was awarded the contract by the competition’s judges to build the monument, in 1838.

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The Scott Monument | Princes Street, Edinburgh (& not a tourist in sight!)

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Sadly, one foggy evening in March 1844, Kemp was intending to walk home to Morningside,  after his meeting with the monument’s building-contractor (offices which were situated near to the end of the Union Canal) and, losing his way in the fog, Kemp fell into the canal. His drowned body was found five days later in the Lochrin Basin, close to the distillery.

Personally, (and despite the fact that a monument to Kemp exists in Eddleston, near Peebles, built on the centenary of Scott’s death, in 1932, I feel this must be every bit as much –  the Kemp Monument, as it is for Scott. (Besides, it’s a darn site grander and, more suitably befitting).

In the autumn of 1844, Kemp’s son, Thomas, placed the last stone.

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As always, thank you for visiting FULLSPECTRA, also, for your always welcomed clicks and comments. If you wish to receive updates and notifications of future posts, please consider clicking ‘FOLLOW’, below. No unauthorised copying or redistribution. All Rights Reserved.

ALL WORDS & IMAGES © FULLSPECTRA / ROB LOWE PHOTOGRAPHY 2017

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